Family Cookbook 2.0, part 3


Has it been more than a week since we left off with the cookbook project? My how blog time flies. Let’s continue.

During the first two posts on this topic, we converted the old XPress file, and tagged the content in InDesign and exported it. Right now we have XML masquerading as HTML. Let’s open it in Dreamweaver.

First off, we’ll format the source code, so we can actually read it. We’re OK doing this because we aren’t taking this content back into InDesign. If we were, right now the robot from Lost in Space would be yelling, “Danger Will Robinson!” The problem is that Dreamweaver doesn’t give a hoot where it places the whitespace characters to format the code. They end up everywhere, including inside every element tag. So if we re-import this into InDesign we get…a huge mess.

Orginally, the title element of Richard’s Pancakes was very tidy with just one return in the right place.

clean XML in InDesign

Now, it has 4.

Nasty extra whitspace

Who left the bumbling Dr. Smith in charge of our content? Oh, the pain.

Happily, we’re on a one way street to the Web, where those whitespace characters won’t be as troublesome.

Start off by adding the some infrastructure at the top:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>

<head><link href=”cookbook.css” rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css”>
</link> <title>Ethan’s Family Cookbook</title>
</head>

And wrap everything else in <body>

Then let’s get rid of the Story (capital S) elements, wrapped around the recipe cards, an artifact of those pesky inline frames. We’ll just Find/Replace with nothing, making sure to check “Case sensitive”, since we do have story, (lower case s) elements we want to keep: the chefs’ stories about their recipes.

Now we’ll replace all the names of the tags that came from InDesign style names with valid HTML tags, plus class declarations for hooking into CSS.

To give credit where credit is due, this idea is straight out of chapter 9 of A Designer’s Guide to Adobe InDesign and XML by James Maivald.

So the opening tag <group> gets replaced with <p class=”group”> and the closing </group> becomes plain old </p> Lather, rinse and repeat for <story>, <title>, <chef>, <ingredients>, and <step> elements. I’m also going to lively up the <div> around the recipe card, by adding class=”card” to distinguish it from the other <div>s.

clean code

Validate to check our work. And we get Dreamweaver’s idea of praise for our hard work: “Complete.” Nice. This is a program tossing compliments like manhole covers. How about, “Adequate.” or “Nice job, for a human.”

We preview in the browser, and things look cool with the exception of the degree symbols. So we’ll go back and replace all those with an entity.

Next time, some CSS to finish this sucker off.

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